Monday, December 4, 2017

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA RETURNS TO THE CINEMATHEQUE IN A NEW 70MM RESTORATION

The American Cinematheque has struck a new 70mm print of Lawrence of Arabia (1962) and will have the exclusive rights in the Los Angeles region to exhibit the Best Picture Academy Award Winner at the Aero and Egyptian Theatres in 70mm. Lawrence of Arabia is one of the all-time favorites of American Cinematheque audiences and has been shown several times a year since we re-opened the Egyptian Theatre on December 4, 1998. The Cinematheque will schedule two extended runs per year, one at the Aero Theatre and one at the Egyptian Theatre. The first of these runs will take place December 15-30, 2017 at the Egyptian.



Wednesday, November 15, 2017

"TONIGHT WE HONOR A UNICORN": AMY ADAMS RECEIVES THE 31ST ANNUAL AMERICAN CINEMATHEQUE AWARD PRESENTED BY GROW @ ANNENBERG, by Susan King

There was so much affection for the Amy Adams, recipient of the 31st American Cinematheque Award (presented this year by GRoW @ Annenberg), on November 10th at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, that one expected the audience to break out in the classic tune “Once in Love with Amy.”


Amy Adams holding the 31st American Cinematheque Award. Photo by John Sciulli / Getty Images


Friday, October 13, 2017

THE PRIME OF MISS LOIS SMITH, by Susan King

Actress Lois Smith says she’s absolutely thrilled the Cinematheque’s Aero Theatre is honoring her 62-year-film career with a three-day retrospective, “A Lois Smith Primer,” which opens Oct. 20 and concludes Oct. 22.


“It’s absolutely lovely,” she said during recent phone interview from her home in New York. “The problem I’ve been having with my feelings is that I think ‘Wait a minute, wait a minute, I’m not a movie star.”’

Thursday, October 5, 2017

MICHAEL SHANNON TO PRESENT AMY ADAMS WITH AMERICAN CINEMATHEQUE AWARD

JAKE GYLLENHAAL, TOM HANKS, CHRIS MESSINA, DERMOT MULRONEY, NATALIE PORTMAN, KRISTEN STEWART, JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE, MICHAEL SHANNON AND DENIS VILLENEUVE TO TOAST AMY ADAMS, RECIPIENT OF THE 31st AMERICAN CINEMATHEQUE AWARD SPONSORED BY GRoW @ Annenberg AT GALA TRIBUTE ON 
NOVEMBER 10 AT THE BEVERLY HILTON

Jake Gyllenhaal, Tom Hanks, Chris Messina, Dermot MulroneyNatalie Portman, Justin Timberlake and Kristen Stewart and Dennis Villeneuve will appear in person to toast five-time Academy Award nominated and two-time Golden Globe winning actress Amy Adams, the 31st American Cinematheque Award Sponsored by GRoW @ Annenberg recipient. The award will be presented to Amy Adams by Michael Shannon at the Cinematheque’s annual benefit gala on Friday, November 10, 2017 at The Beverly Hilton (9876 Wilshire Blvd.) in Beverly Hills, CA. The award presentation will be held in the International Ballroom and will include in-person tributes from some of Adams’ colleagues and friends, as well as a taped message from ARRIVAL producer Shawn Levy. Shannon appeared with Adams in three films, including NOCTURNAL ANIMALS, MAN OF STEEL and BATMAN V SUPERMAN: DAWN OF JUSTICE. The Sid Grauman Award will be presented the same evening, to Richard Gelfond and Greg Foster on behalf of Imax.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

STEVEN SPIELBERG & CHRISTOPHER NOLAN TO INTRODUCE CLASSIC RESTORED FILMS AT THE EGYPTIAN THEATRE HOLLYWOOD

THE HOLLYWOOD FOREIGN PRESS ASSOCIATION, THE FILM FOUNDATION, AND THE AMERICAN CINEMATHEQUE’S CELEBRATE THE 75TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS WITH A SERIES OF RESTORED CLASSIC FILMS

  
Steven Spielberg and Christopher Nolan will join the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA), The Film Foundation, and the American Cinematheque in person for select programs in a series celebrating the 75th Anniversary of the Golden Globe Awards. The screening series which will take place Sept. 21-24, 2017 at the Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood will showcase 35mm prints of restored classic films, including Elia Kazan’s A Face In The Crowd, the Powell-Pressburger masterpiece The Red Shoes, Robert Altman’s Come Back To The Five And Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean, the first film version of Death Of A Salesman, and Indian director Satyajit Ray’s acclaimed Apu Trilogy. The film restorations have been made possible in part by grants awarded annually to The Film Foundation by the HFPA. To date, the HFPA, in partnership with The Film Foundation, has helped fund the restoration of over 90 classic feature films.


Tuesday, September 12, 2017

THE RETURN OF THE KING, by Wade Major

Wade Major takes a look at the Apu Trilogy on occasion of our September 24 screening as part of the 75th anniversary of the Golden Globes. The series includes restorations of classic films that were made possible in part by funds awarded annually by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, with The Film Foundation. For more information about the other films in the series, click here

If you’re any kind of movie buff, you know that India makes more feature motion pictures than any other country on earth – but the nation that so famously struggles to this day with its centuries-old caste system also suffers from a kind of film industry caste system. Broken down by language, it is a hierarchy that favors films made in the three most dominant Indian languages – Hindi, Tamil, and Telugu – by a wide margin, relegating other regions to progressively lesser stature.


While Bengali cinema today falls somewhere near the middle of the pack, in the 1950s it was all but non-existent until a 31-year-old graphic designer by the name of Satyajit Ray, inspired by the work of De Sica and Renoir (for whom he had helped scout locations for The River), decided to adapt Bibhutibhushan Bandopadhyay’s beloved 1929 novel Pather Panchali into a film. Filmed intermittently over the course of three years – shutting down whenever they ran out of money and restarting as often as producer Anil Chowdhury was able to scrape together funds – Pather Panchali finally emerged as one of the great film sensations of 1955. Showered with acclaim and awards, Ray’s debut film not only launched the Parallel Cinema movement at home as a counterweight to Hindi-language Bollywood, but finally earned Indian cinema the international respect that had previously eluded it.

An auteur was born, and cinema would never be the same.